Web Finds for September 13, 2018

Web Finds are from my web surfing travels. You’ll find some unique and informative news, apps and websites that you may have never known existed. Enjoy!

Credit Freezes Will Soon Be Free
With the one-year anniversary of the Equifax breach just behind us, here’s a reminder that you will be able to freeze your credit reports and sign up for year-long fraud alerts for free starting Sept. 21 thanks to a federal law passed earlier this year.
Via Lifehacker

IPHONE XS AND XS MAX: HANDS-ON WITH APPLE’S GIANT NEW PHONE
Apple just announced the iPhone XS and XS Max. They’re iterations on last year’s iPhone X, but the XS Max at least stands out in one very notable way: it’s so much larger. The Max has a 6.5-inch screen, making it a bigger phone than even the latest model in Samsung’s famously large Galaxy Note line.
Via The Verge

Apple iPhone XR hands-on: the new default iPhone
The new iPhone XR, which feels like it will be the default iPhone for many people this season. Not only does it have a very similar design to the more expensive iPhone XS model, it has many of the same features for a considerably lower price.
Via The Verge

Hello eSIM: Apple moves the iPhone away from physical SIMs
On Wednesday, Apple announced that its new iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max will use an eSIM—a purely electronic SIM that allows users to maintain a secondary phone line in a single device. That line could be a secondary domestic line (say you’re a journalist and don’t want to have separate personal and work iPhones), or the phone could have an American and Canadian number (if you travel across the border frequently).
Via Ars Technica

Previous Web Finds are here.

Web Finds for June 11, 2018

Web Finds are from my web surfing travels. You’ll find some unique and informative news, apps and websites that you may have never known existed. Enjoy!

17 Basic macOS Terms Every Mac User Needs to Know and Master
Whether a newbie or veteran, you have a whole lot of Apple-specific glossary to pick up and master. But don’t worry, it’s not all that difficult.
Via Makeuseof

10 Strikes and You’re Out — the iOS Feature You’re Probably Not Using But Should
For many years now, iOS has offered an option in the Passcode section of the Settings all: “Erase all data on this iPhone after 10 failed passcode attempts.
Via Daring Fireball

How to Request a Copy of Your Apple ID Account Data
Apple now allows its customers to download a copy of their personally identifiable data from Apple apps and services. This can include purchase or app usage history, Apple Music and Game Center statistics, marketing history, AppleCare support history, and any data stored on Apple servers, including the likes of calendars, photos, and documents.
Via MacRumors

4 Ways to Generate a List of Apps Installed on Your Mac
I ran across this the other day. It’s not something that I would use often but in the right situation it could be very helpful.
Via Makeuseof

Previous Web Finds are here.

iCloud data is stored on Google servers

I always thought my iCloud data was stored in an Apple-owned data center. I’m not sure why I thought that. I guess I just assumed. Turns out it’s not. It’s being stored on Google and Amazon S3 servers.

I’m not sure how I feel about that. I started avoiding Google services several years ago. I left Gmail for Fastmail. I moved my calendars and contacts from Google to Apple Calendar and Contacts. Now I find out that Apple is storing my data on Google servers.

I guess we have to trust that Apple is properly securing our data on Google and Amazon’s servers. They say they are.

iCloud stores a user’s contacts, calendars, photos, documents, and more and keeps the information up to date across all of their devices, automatically. iCloud can also be used by third-party apps to store and sync documents as well as key values for app data as defined by the developer. Users set up iCloud by signing in with an Apple ID and choosing which services they would like to use. iCloud features, including My Photo Stream, iCloud Drive, and iCloud Backup, can be disabled by IT administrators via MDM configuration profiles. The service is agnostic about what is being stored and handles all file content the same way, as a collection of bytes.

Each file is broken into chunks and encrypted by iCloud using AES-128 and a key derived from each chunk’s contents that utilizes SHA-256. The keys and the file’s metadata are stored by Apple in the user’s iCloud account. The encrypted chunks of the file are stored, without any user-identifying information, using third-party storage services, such as S3 and Google Cloud Platform.

​CNBC first reported on this.

Don’t use Facebook’s data tracking Onavo VPN: It’s spying on you!

Facebook is always looking for new ways to violate user privacy. They’ve instituted a new one.

In the Facebook iOS mobile app, they recently added a new button under the Settings menu called “Protect”. When you click on “Protect” it takes you to an app in the App Store called “Onavo Protect – VPN Security”. Don’t install it.

This may seem like a good option for a free security app, but it’s not.

This is indeed a VPN. But, it routes all your web browsing and app usage data to a Facebook server. Think I’m kidding? I’m not. They even tell you they are.

From the Onavo description in the App Store

To provide this layer of protection, Onavo uses a VPN to establish a secure connection to direct all of your network communications through Onavo’s servers. As part of this process, Onavo collects your mobile data traffic. This helps us improve and operate the Onavo service by analyzing your use of websites, apps and data. Because we’re part of Facebook, we also use this info to improve Facebook products and services, gain insights into the products and services people value, and build better experiences.

This is nothing more than Facebook spyware. If you’re looking for a VPN I can recommend TunnelBear. It’s what I use. It’s not free though. But remember if it’s free you’re the product.

Web Finds for January 12, 2018

Web Finds are from my web surfing travels. You’ll find some unique and informative news, apps and websites that you may have never known existed. Enjoy!

Apple planning new, “robust” parental controls to help protect children, teens
In a report by The Wall Street Journal, Apple states it has plans to create new software features that will make its current parental controls on iPhone and other devices “even more robust.”
Via Ars Technica

Apple Shares Updated iOS Security Guide With Info on Face ID, Apple Pay Cash and More
Apple this afternoon published an updated version of its iOS Security white paper for iOS 11 [PDF], with information that covers features introduced in iOS 11.1 and iOS 11.2, like Face ID and Apple Pay Cash.
Via MacRumors

How-To Disable macOS High Sierra Upgrade Notifications
Is it just me or are those daily upgrade notifications for upgrading to macOS High Sierra annoying the bleep out of you? Every time I turn on my MacBook (2017,) it immediately starts up with that exasperating High Sierra notice to upgrade to High Sierra so I can “enjoy the latest technologies and refinements.” And it’s even popping up on my iMac (2015 with Fusion Drive,) that Apple itself recommends NOT updating to High Sierra. And I really DON’T want to upgrade to macOS High Sierra right now on any of my Macs!
Via AppleToolBox

How-To Fix an iPad Keyboard That’s Split in Half or Two
One of the most frequent questions we get from our iPad friends and readers is problems with their iPad keyboards. Specifically, what should you do when your iPad keyboard is split down the middle with half of it on the left side and the other part on the right side of your iPad’s screen. Just how do you get it back together like it should be? For many iFolks, this a very annoying problem that they just can’t figure out how to fix!
Via AppleToolBox

The iPad Gestures You Should Master
Your Dock will follow you wherever you go, in any iPad app. Just swipe up about an inch from the bottom of the screen to bring up your Dock and its list of applications, along with the three most recent apps used. You can add up to 13 apps to your Dock so you have the most important ones at your fingertips, apps you can drag and drop to use for multitasking.
Via lifehacker

Previous Web Finds are here.

Worst passwords of 2017 still include “123456” and “password”

SplashData has published its annual list of the worst passwords of the year. The data was pulled from over five million passwords that were leaked by hackers in 2017.

Despite many well-publicized data leaks in 2017, it looks like many people are continuing to use weak passwords like “123456” and “password” that are easily guessed by hackers.

If you’re still using weak passwords please, please do your self a favor and stop. Get a password manager. I use 1Password. With 1Password I’m able to have a unique strong password for every website that requires a password and the best part is I don’t have to remember them because 1Password does it for me.

1Password has an app for Mac and iOS. LastPass is another option.

Web Finds for December 11, 2017

Web Finds are from my web surfing travels. You’ll find some unique, informative, and some of the coolest websites and apps that you may have never known existed. Enjoy!

How to Use Do Not Disturb While Driving on iPhone
Do Not Disturb While Driving is an iPhone specific safety feature. When Do Not Disturb While Driving is activated on iPhone, no calls, messages, notifications, or alerts will come through to the iPhone. I have my iPhone set to automatically go to do not disturb as soon as my car starts moving.

How to Lock Your Mac Screen and Protect It from Prying Eyes
Whether you’re at home or at work, you might not want other people snooping on your Mac when you step away. Leaving your Mac unlocked and unattended allows others nearby to read your emails, text messages, browser history, and all your files. You don’t need to shut down your Mac, you don’t even need to log out. You can just lock it.

How to restore deleted files from iCloud Drive
I use Dropbox more often than iCloud Drive. One of Dropbox’s features is the ability to recover deleted files. I didn’t know I could also recover deleted files in iCloud Drive.

Phishers Are Upping Their Game. So Should You. — Krebs on Security
This is read is worth your time. Not long ago, phishing attacks were fairly easy for the average Internet user to spot: Full of grammatical and spelling errors, and linking to phony bank or email logins at unencrypted (http:// vs. https://) Web pages. Increasingly, however, phishers are upping their game, polishing their copy and hosting scam pages over https:// connections — complete with the green lock icon in the browser address bar to make the fake sites appear more legitimate.

Previous Web Finds are here.