Web Finds for December 11, 2017

Web Finds are from my web surfing travels. You’ll find some unique, informative, and some of the coolest websites and apps that you may have never known existed. Enjoy!

How to Use Do Not Disturb While Driving on iPhone
Do Not Disturb While Driving is an iPhone specific safety feature. When Do Not Disturb While Driving is activated on iPhone, no calls, messages, notifications, or alerts will come through to the iPhone. I have my iPhone set to automatically go to do not disturb as soon as my car starts moving.

How to Lock Your Mac Screen and Protect It from Prying Eyes
Whether you’re at home or at work, you might not want other people snooping on your Mac when you step away. Leaving your Mac unlocked and unattended allows others nearby to read your emails, text messages, browser history, and all your files. You don’t need to shut down your Mac, you don’t even need to log out. You can just lock it.

How to restore deleted files from iCloud Drive
I use Dropbox more often than iCloud Drive. One of Dropbox’s features is the ability to recover deleted files. I didn’t know I could also recover deleted files in iCloud Drive.

Phishers Are Upping Their Game. So Should You. — Krebs on Security
This is read is worth your time. Not long ago, phishing attacks were fairly easy for the average Internet user to spot: Full of grammatical and spelling errors, and linking to phony bank or email logins at unencrypted (http:// vs. https://) Web pages. Increasingly, however, phishers are upping their game, polishing their copy and hosting scam pages over https:// connections — complete with the green lock icon in the browser address bar to make the fake sites appear more legitimate.

Previous Web Finds are here.

Search Safari tabs on Mac

Have you ever had a bunch tabs open in Safari and wanted to go to one particular tab? It’s a pain to cycle through all the open tabs to find the one you’re looking for.

Here’s a way to search open Safari tabs thanks to a post by Gabe Weatherhead (Macdrifter) this morning.

Here’s a little Safari trick that is just gold. Hit Shift-⌘- to enter the Safari “Show all tabs” mode. From there it’s just a simple ⌘-F to search the open tabs.

I tried this out and it worked perfectly. I often have several tabs open at the same time so I’ll be using this trick often. Thanks Gabe.

Using Alfred to trigger common system commands

One of my most used Alfred features is triggering system commands from the keyboard. This saves me a lot of mouse clicks. I can empty the trash, force quit apps, lock, logout, restart, or shutdown my Mac right from the keyboard.

The System Commands section in Settings has triggers for the most commonly used system commands.

I’ve carried this one step further. Instead of invoking Alfred and typing the trigger I’ve created hotkeys for my most often used system commands. So for example, instead of invoking Alfred and typing logout to bring up the action I use the hotkey ⌃⌥⌘O.

This is something you may want to do so you can download the workflow here.​

How to export Apple Notes as plain text files

Apple’s Notes.app for Mac and iOS has no option for exporting your notes other than PDF. This is not going to work if you’re wanting to move to another notes app like Bear. You might assume your locked in with no way to move your notes.

Well, I have some good news for you. Exporter app in the Mac App Store exports your notes as plain text files to a location of your choice. Exporter preserves creation and modification dates turns note formatting into Markdown, and creates a folder for each notebook inside Notes.app for persevering your organizational structure.

If you’re moving to Bear you will need to import your exported notes.

Modifier key order

I’ve learned a lot about the Mac from following Dr. Drang’s blog. A lot of what he talks about is over my head but some I’m able to pick up on and use in my daily workflow.

Did you know that there’s a proper order for stating the modifier keys in a keyboard shortcut? I didn’t. But I do now.

Dr. Drang explains the the proper modifier key order in stating a keyboard shortcut:

Control (⌃), Option (⌥), and Command (⌘) always go in that order. The oddball is the Shift(⇧) key, which sneaks in just in front of Command.

If you write about Mac keyboard shortcuts, as I did yesterday, you should know how to do it right. Just as there’s a proper order for adjectives in English, there’s a proper order for listing the modifier keys in a shortcut.

The order is similar to how you see them down at the bottom left of your keyboard.

The last bit of standard syntax is that the letter key in the shortcut (if there is a letter) is always presented as a capital, even when the Shift key isn’t used.

​When entering a keyboard shortcut, you’re not typing a letter, you’re pressing a set of physical keys on the keyboard in front of you. The symbols on the letter keys are capitals, so that’s the appropriate way to identify those keys.

How I organize my Mac menu bar apps

I have collected my share of menu bar utility apps on my Macs. Some of them I like to see all the time and others I only need to see occasionally or not at all. Bartender 3 lets me organize my menu bar apps by hiding them, rearranging them, or moving them to the Bartender Bar.

I also like that I can place an app in the Bartender Bar but any time the app updates the icon will appear in the main menu bar. An example this would be the way I’ve configured Dropbox. I have it set to be in the Bartender Bar but anytime it updates the icon will show in the main menu bar for 15 seconds.

If you want to cleanup your menu bar give Bartender a try. You can download a 4 week trial here.

Checking out the new Firefox Quantum browser for Mac

Back in my PC days, Firefox was my browser of choice. So when I moved to the Mac I installed Firefox because that was what I was used to. After a month or so of using Firefox, I tried Safari and have never looked back until today.

I noticed a couple of articles about Firefox Quantum in my newsfeed yesterday. I thought I would check it out.

Here’s my quick takeaway:

It’s fast. Really fast! The speed increase comes from the completely overhauled core engine with new technology. I like the new look and feel. But I’m most impressed with how fast it is.

I’m going to run it as my default browser for a few days as a test. I doubt that it can replace Safari. It will definitely replace Chrome as my backup browser though.

If you’re already a Firefox user you should receive an automatic update otherwise you can download it here.

MacRumors has a good review of Firefox Quantum for Mac which you can read here.

Web Finds for November 5, 2017

Web Finds are from my web surfing travels. You’ll find some unique, informative, and some of the coolest websites and apps that you may have never known existed. Enjoy!

How to Hide Recent & Suggested Apps from iPad Dock in iOS 11
One of the various new features introduced to iPad with modern iOS is a revamped Dock, complete with a new Recent and Suggested Apps section that appears on the far right side of the iPad Dock, delineated by a faint separator line.

Cardhop
Cardhop for Mac is a new way to deal with contacts. The magical parsing engine is incredibly intuitive, letting you search, add, edit, and interact with your contacts using a simple sentence!

Path Finder 7
Path Finder is a Mac Finder replacement with power user file management features. Path Finder is designed to work with a variety of different workflows. Whether you’re a power user who accesses, manages, and manipulates a bunch of files a day, or just a casual user who loves being on top of everything.

Affirm: Easy monthly payments
With Affirm iOS app, you can split almost any online purchase into easy monthly payments. Unlike a credit card, there are no hidden fees and no surprises. Just enter a few pieces of information for a real-time decision, then choose the payment schedule that works for you!

Previous Web Finds are here.