Things 3 – for personal task management

I’ve never found a task manager app that worked the way I wanted it to.

My frustration with Fantastical as is task manager is in order to have a task with a due date you have to have a reminder. A lot of times I don’t want or need reminders but I do sometimes want a due date. This led to constantly rescheduling reminders.

In Things, I can create a task with a due date and no reminder or with a reminder. I can also have tasks that I can through in Someday (kind of like a bucket list) or Anytime.

When I used Todoist it never felt right. It was too advanced for my simpler task management needs. I hated seeing unimportant tasks from the day before show up as overdue the next day and then have to reschedule them.

In Things, tasks placed in the Today simply move to the next day when unfinished.​

The Upcoming view lacks the level of detail of Todoist, but I never used those features anyway. All I need is to glance at what’s coming up in the next few days, and that’s what Things 3 provides. Tasks can be easily dragged from one day to another, and each day has its calendar items displayed here as well for a sense of how busy I’ll be.

Things 3 just feels like it’s made for the way I think about tasks.

Check it out. There are Mac and iOS versions of Things 3 and sync works across all your devices.

Web Finds for October 6, 2017

Web Finds are from my web surfing travels. You’ll find some unique, informative, and some of the coolest websites and apps that you may have never known existed. Enjoy!

60 Mac Tips, Volume 2 – David Sparks & Brett Terpstra
60 Mac Tips, Volume 2, is a collection of tricks and tips to make you more efficient on your Mac. With 60 screencasts and two hours of video, the book explains why each trick or tip is special and shows you how to set it up and use it on your Mac. Learn these tips and turn yourself into a Mac power user.

Among these 60 screencasts are tips on macOS, Siri for the Mac, using the keyboard, Spotlight, Automator, Safari, Mail, Apple Notes, Apple Photos, Terminal Tips, and third-party apps. After reading and watching these tips and tricks, you’ll be more efficient on your Mac than ever.

Whink
Whink for iOS is uniquely designed for the iPad and iPhone to provide the best note-taking experience at school, at home, and at work. And with iCloud, your notes are always up-to-date on all your devices. Supports Apple pencil.

BackupLoupe
BackupLoupe for Mac is an alternative GUI for Time Machine. At its core it provides a Finder-like interface where you get to select a snapshot and it will show you what has been backed up.

STRYD
Stryd is a power meter for runners. Using a tiny device clipped onto the shoe, Stryd measures data at lab-grade power when you run. Using power as a metric, Stryd understands how fast you can run (fitness), how long your can run (muscle endurance), and how well you run (form and efficiency). It then guides you through purposeful training, efficient running, and faster racing.

Previous Web Finds are here.

Turn off in app rating requests in iOS 11

Since installing iOS 11 I keep getting in-app popups asking for a rating. I find this annoying. If I want to rate an app I can go to the App Store to rate it. I don’t need a popup pestering me.

Here’s how I turned off in-app rating requests. Go to Settings > iTunes & App Store > In-App Ratings & Reviews and turn it off.

By the way, while I was there I also turned off Video Autoplay.

My initial thoughts on iOS 11 – iPhone

I waited for a few days to install the iOS 11 update on my iPhone 7 Plus. I wanted to make sure I wasn’t hearing or reading about issues before I jumped in. The installation went smoothly and it only took about 20 minutes. I had heard some comments about it taking up to an hour or more so I was surprised it went so quickly. After the update completed I tested all my apps and they are all working fine.

The overall look and feel of iOS 11 is somewhat different from iOS 10. The new iOS 11 design theme now features large bold titles that feel in your face. Don’t like it. I read part of Federico’s review and there doesn’t seem to be a way to get rid of them. Oh well. It’ll take some getting used to.

Two new features that I’ll be using are Do Not Disturb While Driving and Emergency SOS to disable Touch ID if I find myself in an emergency situation. The new Control Center was a little confusing at first but with the help of Federico’s review, I quickly got a grasp of how it works.

I’m not an iPad user so I can’t comment about iOS 11 on iPad.

If you’re looking for a full review of iOS 11 I recommend Federico Viticci’s review at MacStories or by Andrew Cunningham’s review at Ars Technica.

Supported devices for iOS 11 and macOS High Sierra

We’re just days away from the release of iOS 11 and macOS High Sierra. Here’s a list of the supported devices for both.

Official list of supported iPhones:

iPhone 7
iPhone 7 Plus
iPhone 6s
iPhone 6s Plus
iPhone 6
iPhone 6 Plus
iPhone SE
iPhone 5s”

Official list of supported iPads:

12.9-inch iPad Pro (2nd generation)
12.9-inch iPad Pro (1st generation)
iPad Pro (10.5-inch)
iPad Pro (9.7-inch)
iPad Air 2
iPad Air
iPad (5th generation)
iPad mini 4
iPad mini 3
iPad mini 2”

Supported devices for macOS High Sierra:

iMac: (late 2009 or newer)
MacBook/MacBook (Retina): (late 2009 or newer)
MacBook Pro: (mid-2010 or newer)
MacBook Air: (late 2010 or newer)
Mac Mini: (mid-2010 or newer)
Mac Pro: (mid-2010 or newer)
iMac Pro (2017)”

My Instapaper workflow

Awhile back I wrote that I was ditching Instapaper and Pocket and using Pinboard for reading later. As it turned out, there was a flaw with that.

Here’s what was missing from Pinboard. The ability to highlight text and add notes as I’m reading.

I read a lot. Reading is where I get the inspiration for many of the articles I write. So Instapaper is part of my blogging workflow. Here’s how it works.

I collect everything I want to read in Instapaper. Once in Instapaper, I highlight things that catch my attention and add notes as I’m reading. If after reading an article I want to comment on it in a blog post or it gives me inspiration for a new article I go to the bottom of the article in iOS and tap Share All Notes. This exports all my highlights and notes to the iOS share sheet. From the iOS share sheet, I send the export to Drafts for delivery to my Writing In Progress folder in Dropbox. Now I can open the file in Byword, BBEdit or iA Writer for editing on my Mac.

Web Finds for September 2, 2017

Web Finds are from my web surfing travels. You’ll find some unique, informative, and some of the coolest websites and apps that you may have never known existed. Enjoy!

MarginNote
MarginNote is a powerful Mac and iOS reading tool for learners. Whether you are a student, a teacher, a researcher, a lawyer or someone with a curious mind to learn, MarginNote can help you quickly organize, study and manage large volumes of PDFs and EPUBs. All in one learning app enables you to highlight PDF and EPUB, take note, create mind map, review flashcards and saves you from switching endlessly between different Apps.

Raindrop.io
Raindrop.io is a Mac and iOS bookmark manager service for your inspiration, read later, media and stuff. Save anything from around the web, articles, photos, videos, presentations, web sites screenshots and more. Organize with autosuggested tags, thematic collections, bulk operations and more.

And no I’m not leaving Pinboard.

Power Manager
Power Manager is Mac software that reduces a computer’s energy costs. Power Manager lets you automate sophisticated tasks and improve your Mac’s power management. With Power Manager you can create sophisticated energy saving schedules and automate complex tasks. Power Manager can power on a Mac, run a series of tasks, and power off the Mac without requiring any interaction.

SuperTab or Contexts 3
SuperTab and Context 3 are Mac apps for switching between application windows. They are Command-Tab options on steroids.

Previous Web Finds are here.

iOS RSS Feed Reader

Last week David Sparks tweeted out some codes (they’ve all been taken) to get a free version of the iOS app Unread.

That got me thinking, I haven’t used Unread for quite some time. I switched from Unread to Reeder about a year ago so maybe it’s time to give Unread another look. So I went into my paid apps in the App Store and downloaded it.

I put Unread on my iPhone home screen and relegated Reeder to a folder on my second page for seldom used apps. After a couple of days using Unread I moved back to Reeder. Don’t get me wrong, Unread is a nice app and if you’re looking for an iOS RSS reader app you should definitely give it a try.

Here’s why I prefer Reeder over Unread. The way Reeder presents the feed is easier for me to quickly scan through. Also saving things to Instapaper for reading later in Reeder is a left swipe but in Unread it’s three actions a long press on the article -> tap share -> tap Instapaper.