Supported devices for iOS 11 and macOS High Sierra

We’re just days away from the release of iOS 11 and macOS High Sierra. Here’s a list of the supported devices for both.

Official list of supported iPhones:

iPhone 7
iPhone 7 Plus
iPhone 6s
iPhone 6s Plus
iPhone 6
iPhone 6 Plus
iPhone SE
iPhone 5s”

Official list of supported iPads:

12.9-inch iPad Pro (2nd generation)
12.9-inch iPad Pro (1st generation)
iPad Pro (10.5-inch)
iPad Pro (9.7-inch)
iPad Air 2
iPad Air
iPad (5th generation)
iPad mini 4
iPad mini 3
iPad mini 2”

Supported devices for macOS High Sierra:

iMac: (late 2009 or newer)
MacBook/MacBook (Retina): (late 2009 or newer)
MacBook Pro: (mid-2010 or newer)
MacBook Air: (late 2010 or newer)
Mac Mini: (mid-2010 or newer)
Mac Pro: (mid-2010 or newer)
iMac Pro (2017)”

iOS 11 has a way to quickly disable Touch ID and require a passcode

As reported, last week, by The Verge iOS 11 has a way to quickly and discreetly disable Touch ID.

According to The Verge:

Apple is adding an easy way to quickly disable Touch ID in iOS 11. A new setting, designed to automate emergency services calls, lets iPhone users tap the power button quickly five times to call 911. This doesn’t automatically dial the emergency services by default, but it brings up the option to and also temporarily disables Touch ID until you enter a passcode. Twitter users discovered the new option in the iOS 11 public beta, and The Verge has verified it works as intended.

This is a handy feature because it allows Touch ID to be disabled in circumstances where someone might be able to force a phone to be unlocked with a fingerprint. With Touch ID disabled in this way, there is no way to physically unlock an iPhone with Touch ID without the device’s passcode.

As a side note. Last week Mashable reported that according to a Virginia judge a cop can force you to unlock your phone with Touch id but not with a passcode.

As pointed out by John Gruber:

Until iOS 11 ships, it’s worth remembering that you’ve always been able to require your iPhone’s passcode to unlock it by powering it off. A freshly powered-on iPhone always requires the passcode to unlock.

Apple releases security updates for iPhone and Mac. Update now and be safe online.

On Monday Apple released security updates iOS 10.3.2 (for iPhone and iPad users), MacOS, and OS X. They also released updates for watchOS 3.2.2, iTunes, Safari, tvOS and iCloud for Windows 6.2.1.

Looking at the list of fixes it is clear that scores of security vulnerabilities have been addressed for iPhones, iPads and Macs.

US-CERT encourages users and administrators to apply the necessary updates.

Good news for the future of Mac Pro and iMac

Apple has given us some insight into the future of the Mac Pro and iMac. In a recent meeting Phil Schiller, Craig Federighi, and John Ternus (vice president, hardware engineering — in charge of Mac hardware) held a 90 minute meeting with five writers who were invited for what was billed as “a small roundtable discussion about the Mac”: Matthew Panzarino, Lance Ulanoff, Ina Fried, John Paczkowski, and John Gruber.

Personally, I’m excited to hear that the future of the Mac Pro and iMac is solid. I love my iMac! John Gruber wrote an excellent review of what took place at the meeting and you can read his article here.

Here are some of the highlights:

Apple is currently hard at work on a “completely rethought” Mac Pro, with a modular design that can accommodate high-end CPUs and big honking hot-running GPUs, and which should make it easier for Apple to update with new components on a regular basis. They’re also working on Apple-branded pro displays to go with them.

I also have not-so-great news:

These next-gen Mac Pros and pro displays “will not ship this year”. (I hope that means “next year”, but all Apple said was “not this year”.) In the meantime, Apple is today releasing meager speed-bump updates to the existing Mac Pros. The $2999 model goes from 4 Xeon CPU cores to 6, and from dual AMD G300 GPUs to dual G500 GPUs. The $3999 model goes from 6 CPU cores to 8, and from dual D500 GPUs to dual D800 GPUs. Nothing else is changing, including the ports. No USB-C, no Thunderbolt 3 (and so no support for the LG UltraFine 5K display).

But more good news, too:

Apple has “great” new iMacs in the pipeline, slated for release “this year”, including configurations specifically targeted at large segments of the pro market.

We’re inside a nondescript single-story office building on Apple’s extended old campus, across De Anza Boulevard from One Infinite Loop. This is Apple’s Product Realization Lab for Mac hardware, better known, internally, as “the machine lab”. This is where they make and refine prototypes for new Mac hardware. We don’t get to see anything cool. There is no moment where they lift a black cloth and show us prototypes of future hardware. The setting feels chosen simply to set the tone that innovative Mac hardware design — across the entire Mac lineup — is not a thing of the past.

There are only nine people at the table. Phil Schiller, Craig Federighi, and John Ternus (vice president, hardware engineering — in charge of Mac hardware) are there to speak for Apple. Bill Evans from Apple PR is there to set the ground rules and run the clock. (We had 90 minutes.) The other five are writers who were invited for what was billed as “a small roundtable discussion about the Mac”: Matthew Panzarino, Lance Ulanoff, Ina Fried, John Paczkowski, and yours truly.

Regarding iMacs, Schiller also said that new iMacs are in the works, slated for release some time this year (no specifics other than “this year”), including “configurations of iMac specifically with the pro customer in mind and acknowledging that our most popular desktop with pros is an iMac.”

My takeaway is that the Mac’s future is bright. Mac sales were up in 2016, once again outpacing the PC industry as a whole, and the new MacBook Pros are a hit, with sales up “about 20 percent” year over year. The Mac is a $25 billion business for Apple annually, and according to the company there are 100 million people in the active Mac user base worldwide.

What’s new in macOS Sierra 10.12.4

Lory Gil, Writing for iMore

What kinds of goodies did Apple give Mac owners in macOS 10.12.4? Not much, but it’s got it where it counts.

Though Apple is only rolling out a minor update with macOS 10.12.4, it does bring with it a couple of new features, the most important being the addition of Night Shift to the Mac. This is something I’ve been waiting for for a very long time, though I’ve been happily satiated with the f.lux app (thank you for all you’ve done for Mac users, f.lux). Here’s everything that’s new in macOS 10.12.4.

I’ve been using f.lux on my MacBook Pro for several years now. I’m interested to see how Night Shift compares. Night Shift has been working perfectly on my iPhone and I suspect it will be the same on my MacBook. You can read Lory’s full review here.

What’s new in iOS 10.3

Serenity Caldwell, Writing for iMore

Apple’s newest iOS update is out and chock full of little updates and surprises.

After too many betas to count, iOS 10.3 is on the scene. It brings Apple’s new file system and in-app reviews program to the public, reorganizes iCloud settings, introduces the Find My AirPods feature, and adds new SiriKit features — along with a host of other little details.

We’ve put together a rundown of everything new in iOS 10.3 for your perusal — here you go!

I upgraded my phone today, and with no problems even considering it was changing the file system. I like that Apple ID, iCloud, iTunes and App Store settings are available at the very top of iPhone Settings now. You can read Serenity’s full review here.

Apple Says It Has Patched The Vulnerabilities Mentioned In The Wikileaks Dump Of CIA Cyber Tools

Yesterday Wikileaks leaked documents named Vault 7. Vault 7 details the government’s efforts to hack popular devices like iPhones, Android phones, and Samsung smart TVs. According to a Wikileaks Vault 7 press release the CIA has a special branch dedicated to attacks against the iPhone.

Despite iPhone’s minority share (14.5%) of the global smart phone market in 2016, a specialized unit in the CIA’s Mobile Development Branch produces malware to infest, control and exfiltrate data from iPhones and other Apple products running iOS, such as iPads. CIA’s arsenal includes numerous local and remote “zero days” developed by CIA or obtained from GCHQ, NSA, FBI or purchased from cyber arms contractors such as Baitshop. The disproportionate focus on iOS may be explained by the popularity of the iPhone among social, political, diplomatic and business elites.

Yesterday, Apple said in a statement provided to TechCrunch that most of the vulnerabilities detailed in the leaks have been patched.

“Apple is deeply committed to safeguarding our customers’ privacy and security. The technology built into today’s iPhone represents the best data security available to consumers, and we’re constantly working to keep it that way. Our products and software are designed to quickly get security updates into the hands of our customers, with nearly 80 percent of users running the latest version of our operating system. While our initial analysis indicates that many of the issues leaked today were already patched in the latest iOS, we will continue work to rapidly address any identified vulnerabilities. We always urge customers to download the latest iOS to make sure they have the most recent security updates.”

I think this tweet puts the whole thing in perspective.